angiogenesis and omelettes

How many eggs do you prepare at one time? We did 30 on Monday.


These weren't to eat, however. They were fertilized eggs we bought from the Ag unit over at State and we got them for a CAM (chorioallantoic membrane) assay to test some peptides for angiogenesis properties.

Only a bit over half were actually fertilize so some rooster is apparently falling down on the job. Bad rooster! But the 17 that are fertile will be used to further the reach of medical knowledge. Just warms your heart, huh?

The photo above was the eggs in an incubator waiting for us to be ready to do the assay prep. Below are the eggs after deshelling (that's a serious scientifc procedure marked mainly by hitting the side of the egg against a hard object) and being placed into petri dishes. The assay takes 2 weeks to run and I'll be taking more pictures...

Comments

SassyAssy said…
I guess if you ever want a career change, Waffle House would be impressed with your egg cracking skills! The bonus? you get to make the hashbrowns raw like you love them.
GA Girl said…
Do you get to take the non-fertile eggs home to practice your "deshelling" technique?
utenzi said…
Ewwww! There's just something about the idea of rooster sperm floating about that totally takes my appetite away. I might never eat another egg!
GA Girl said…
If you've had brown eggs before you might have eaten a few sperm cells. When I lived in Maine, that was all we could get - and we bought them from a farmer who kept roosters with the hens. Had to throw eggs out occasionally...
Michael Manning said…
Well, I guess you have to say "research is research"! Take care, Utenzi!
Pearl said…
Arrr, that be making a lot of rum egg nog laddie!

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