idioms

The correct use of language is very important when you're a writer. Few things can alienate a reader more than screwing up something that they hold as a pet peeve. For example, I hate it when your and you're are confused. One is a contraction! The difference should be obvious. *cough* Where was I? Oh, yes...

However using language correctly can be boring so it's a good idea to include colorful bits also. The use of similes is one approach to add color and make your writing as large as life--which is an example of a simile. Another approach is to add in idioms. This can date your writing but it's a lot of fun.

Here's a list of some Australian idioms, but not the obvious ones made famous here in the States in Crocodile Dundee. What are some of your favorites from close to home or around the world?

Short arms deep pockets       cheap
Mollydooker       someone left handed
You are a Grot       very dirty or unkempt
Who cut the dog in half?       fart
Lob-in on someone       visit without warning
On the Wallaby track       looking for a job
Bangs like a dunny door in a storm       loud sex


Sue Charlton: That croc was going to eat me alive.
Crocodile Dundee: Oh, I wouldn't hold that against him. Same thought crossed my mind once or twice.

Comments

Aaron said…
From the show "Newsradio":

"Nobody will care that the main course is filet mignon if the appetizer is turds in a blanket." (approximate)

Meaning: first impressions are important
utenzi said…
*gulp* I'll try real hard to get that image out of my head, Aaron.
Dave said…
Short arms deep pockets... I like that one!

Can I use the other other way around? As in, "for someone with deep pockets, he sure has short arms!"

...or is it something you shouldn't mess with. Please advise! :)
magz said…
well, roll me in the cowpies and call me Stinky... ya dun gave me a new handle here dave!

from now on, please refer to moi as Mollydooker Magz.. hahahahaaa
Marie said…
I am constantly amazed at how we can publish things like photos of our ankles or dogs wearing wigs and then people read it, comment upon it, and come back for more. I love blogs.
utenzi said…
Dave, feel free to use it in any way you see fit. By and large the Aussies are a very forgiving folk.

Maggie, I'm left handed also--at least when it comes to writing.

Marie, it is pretty amazing. Both that anyone wants to read this stuff and also that we're writing it and sending it out. Your page, with it's wonderful photos is easier to understand. Beauty is always appreciated.
kenju said…
I also hate it when your and you're are used incorrectly!

That ankle is really bad looking. You should not be walking on it, I think.
utenzi said…
Thanks, Judy. I've been off it for the most part these past 5 days but tomorrow I might have to bite the proverbial bullet and go back to work. We'll see if I can get anything on my feet in the morning...
dena said…
I am dying over "cut the dog in half", and am going to have to teach my 4 year old to start using that one.

visiting from michele's.
Yaeli said…
As the token Aussie posting here I have to say that I have never heard of Mollydooker, Cutting the dog in half, or being on the wallaby track. That's not to say that they are incorrect. They could very well be valid terms, they just might be a bit dated. :o)
utenzi said…
I'm not surprised Yaeli. I was suspicious when I'd not heard of many of the expressions before. I culled these out of a list of several hundred. They're probably either very old or just fake!
Michelle said…
LOL, as the second Aussie here, indeed they may be out dated however some are still used quite regularly.

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